Scott

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Scott
@CrazyHamSales
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April 2015

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Printer Guide Reviewer 2017

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19 hours 57 sec ago - Commented on Makerbot Replicator 2/2X MightyBoards! Rev H

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I am in the USA.  I have dealt with a few that the power plug got jammed in upside down, which causes reverse polarity to everything, but generally it just blows up U1, the A4403 Buck Regulator, which is why you don't have 5v and the board won't boot.  Sadly they didn't add reverse polarity protection on the input after the fuse, so the fuse won't pop and save it when it gets reversed, i think they figured nobody would be able to with the power plug they used, but as you found out it is possible!!  The A4403 is pretty cheap, a couple bucks, but in some cases i have also seen this problem pop the capacitors associated with that component.  They are a bugger to replace because its such a small SMD part and it has a center pad for heat dissipation under it, so the board wicks away the heat pretty fast while your trying to remove it.  However i have repaired this problem multiple times and it is possible to do it.  Being that your in Melbourne though the shipping both ways plus labor might be pretty expensive for you.  I generally charge a flat rate of $50USD for general board repair plus the cost of components and return shipping.  If you want to discuss it further drop me an email, crazyhamsales@mediacombb.net and we can see what i can do in regards to shipping costs etc.

 

They must have really worked hard at that power plug, takes quite a bit of force to jam it in upside down!

1 month 4 days ago - Commented on Makerbot Replicator 2/2X MightyBoards! Rev H

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I could ship to Italy, however, i am out of stock on working boards.  I will extend my repair service to your existing boards if you wanted to ship them over for repair?

1 month 4 days ago - Commented on Makerbot Replicator 2/2X MightyBoards! Rev H

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The most compatible that i know of is the Geeetech Rev G board, its a combination of the Rev E from the Rep 1 and the Rev G from the Rep 2, they used the same connector location layout but went to the switching regulator of the later Rev G version to prevent blowing up the 5v regulator.

 

The only bad part is that you will have to take your original Rev E board and salvage all the connectors off it unless you want to chop all your wiring plugs off, because they went with screw terminals for everything instead of connectors and headers like Makerbot did.  Usually what i do to replace a Rev E board is get the Geeetech board and desolder and replace all the jacks with the ones from the dead Rev E board.  Most importantly though is the power input jack, they soldered a screw terminal into that place, but the stock connector jack will go in its place as the board layout is correct for it.

2 months 1 week ago - Commented on Air-prints on replicator 2

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I will agree with Steve's comments, the stock extruder drive block with the plunger is a horrible design, even Makerbot themselves replaced it and provided replacements for them at one time.  You need a spring loaded extruder drive, my suggestion is to get an all aluminum one, they are fairly cheap on eBay.  Here is the style i use on all my printers from Rep 1 through Rep 2X, they are great reliable replacements.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/3D-printer-Makerbot-Replicator-2-extruder-upgra...

 

The other suggestions i can make in regards to your other comments.. If your hearing small pops as its extruder thats usually due to moisture trapped in the filament.  Your hearing the moisture expand rapidly into steam and popping, many call it popcorning when this happens.  Its fixable, if i get filament that's a bit moist i just toss the whole spool in the oven at a low temp, 100-150F degrees and let it cook an hour or two, the other option is in a sealed container with a lot of dessicant and just let it sit.  But a good extruder can power on through slightly damp filament, although your print quality won't be the greatest.

 

As for the loose heater block, its important to set it up correctly.  The way i do it is screw the throat down into the top of the heater block first without the nozzle in it, the Makerbot throats have a relief area with no thread, screw the throat down into the top of the heater block until the top edge of the short area of the thread at the bottom end of it is just flush with the top of the heater block, then screw your nozzle in finger tight, install it back into the mounting block and snug up the nuts that hold it to the block and then do a preheat cycle, let it get up to temp and cook just a bit to make sure its fully heated then give the nozzle just a bit more with a wrench or nut driver, i prefer to use a 7mm wrench that fits my nozzles just to snug it up about a quarter turn, then if you need to straighten the heater block cause it might turn after snugging the nozzle let it all cool down nice and cold again and loosen the top nut on the mounting block and the bottom nut on the mounting block, every Makerbot i have worked on has a nut on both sides of the mounting block on the throat, turn the heater block and the throat back to straighten it up and then just retighten those two nuts.

 

The reason for lightly tightening the nozzle then retightening after heating is that aluminum expands when heated, so the heater block expands and everything loosens back up, so you have to snug it back up in the heated state.  Another note here about this, if done properly that nozzle will be REALLY TIGHT when the heater block is cold, so never try to do a nozzle replacement on a cold extruder, always do a preheat first to remove the nozzle or your likely to strip out the threads of the aluminum heater block.  I come across that all the time repairing these.

 

Once you get everything adjusted properly and a good drive block like the aluminum one i linked you to that should end your feed issues!

2 months 1 week ago - Commented on Filament Filling Extruder - Help!

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The only thing i can suggest in that case is heat up the extruder, i'm not familar with your machine but it appears to be a J-Head type bowden extruder, use the preheat option on the printer and let it cook for a while and hopefully start to soften up that big glob you got in there and then with some needle nose pliers or forceps start picking it out as it softens up.  Its going to take some time and effort, a hot air gun to help heat it up might also help, been there done that on really bad messes like that.  Once you manage to get enough of that plastic out you will have to continue taking it apart and cleaning until you get all that blue plastic out of there.  Then your going to have to fix the original problem, it looks to me like you got a leak where the heat break, aka the throat, screws into the heater block, this allowed it to ooze out and make that mess.  Its going to be a complete tear down and rebuild of the extruder, and if your lucky you should be able to save all the parts, though its going to take a massive cleaning.  Is this PLA or ABS?  If its ABS then your in luck, you can get the bulk of that plastic off get the entire J-Head removed from the print head and just submerge the whole thing in Acetone overnight and let it start to dissolve the plastic off, that and a wire brush will clean it up with some patience.  If its PLA then your really in for some work, as your only options are heat and wire brush and keep working at it to get it all cleaned off.

2 months 2 weeks ago - Commented on Replicator 2/2X Heaters, Why People??

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I fully get that having a plug and play replacement is probably a lot of the motivation, i just can't believe they are paying those prices for them!!  Maybe i should start selling replacements at $20 each... LOL

2 months 2 weeks ago - Posted a new Thread

Ok pet peeve time...   Why are people selling and buying heaters for these printers at $45-$55 each???  I know they are selling because when i look at the listings on eBay it shows the number sold.  And Fargo3d sells them for these outrageous prices also.  

2 months 2 weeks ago - Commented on Makerbot KeyPad Repair

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I've seen something similar done with the wrapper from a piece of chewing gum, it works for a while, but the aluminum vs the copper will just go bad after a while, the aluminum will oxidize and start leaving bits on the traces of the PCB.  I had one in for repair a while back that the display was dancing around on it like buttons were being pushed but they weren't, turned out to be little flakes of aluminum from previous repair.  

2 months 3 weeks ago - Commented on Makerbot KeyPad Repair

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Welcome!  I have fixed remotes, game controllers, door keypads, etc.. The list goes on.  I recently found a seller in China on eBay that has assortment containers with everything from 1.5mm to 10mm diameter pads in it.  With one of those handy i can fix pretty much and resistive keypad i come across.

 

After seeing a few Makerbots with thumbtacks and nails shoved into the back of the keypad i figured i would share a better way to fix them... lol

2 months 3 weeks ago - Posted a new Thread

I must get asked this 10-15 times a month now that these printers are getting old enough that their keypads are wearing out.  The problem with the keypads is that Makerbot used a really cheap method of manufacturing that coats/paints on the black conductive spot on the back of the keypad buttons, and they wear out from use pretty quickly.  So i wanted to show how i fix these all the time.  

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